Pix Taken the McRight Way | Here in Brampton Magazine

ImagePix Taken the McRight Way

by Kagan Pittman

Whether you’re promoting your business or a product, needing portraits or event photography, you want only the best shots. So when looking for  a professional photographer whom else should you turn to but someone  passionate about what they do?

Jeanne McRight

PIX Photography is a solo business run by Jeanne McRight, professional photographer and artist.

With over 35 years of experience and over 30 visual arts grants and awards, Jeanne’s credentials are only the tip of the iceberg of what makes her stand out.

Raised by avid photographers, Jeanne got her first camera at 8 years old. “I would go out with my father and we’d take pictures. I still have my little Brownie Hawkeye camera… and it works!”

Specializing in commercial photography, Jeanne prides herself as a jack-of-all trades photographer. Her jobs include headshots, portraits, event photography, advertising, architecture, interiors and business promotions.

Originally from the United States, Jeanne came to Canada with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree from Tyler School of Art of Temple University in Philadelphia. There she learned skills in fine arts, design and composition, which have translated into her photography today.

Jeanne McRight has refined her skills in years of specialized workshops. “Although I went to art school, I’m basically self-taught in photography.”

As a result of her background in visual arts, Jeanne treats her photographs like graphic compositions. “My commercial photography is like illustration in the visual arts,” she says.

“It’s taking somebody’s idea or working with someone who has a need and helping them realize that need. I am attracted by that need and try to fulfill it. That’s what my commercial photography is about.”

Aside from PIX Photography, Jeanne showcases her fine art photography at http://www.jeannemcright.com. Often in black and white, the images presented are the types of photos you may see on someone’s wall rather than in commercial use.

Jeanne also taught at the Etobicoke School of the Arts, teaching visual arts and photography. “The best teachers are facilitators,” Jeanne says. “They set interesting problems and allow students to solve them under guidance without giving them more instruction than they need.”

With all her experience comes the need for quality tools. With a personal studio and wide range of equipment to serve any need, Jeanne feels prepared for any job.

Carrying two camera bodies at a time during events, Jeanne works to avoid missing anything. “I don’t need to struggle with changing lenses, I can just pick one up and shoot pick another one up and shoot. I choose the equipment to suit the need.”

Photography is usually one of those things that people think is easy; pick up the camera, point and shoot. But when your needs are professional or if you simply want the best results possible, the passion and extensive experience of photographers like Jeanne McRight can meet the demand.

via Pix Taken the McRight Way | Here in Brampton Magazine.

 

Absolute Towers With Wrapped Oaks, Mississauga, Ontario

Absolute Towers With Wrapped Oaks, Mississauga, Ontario

Altered natural forms and their relationship to architecture in the urban environment. Black and white photograph ©2014 Jeanne McRight. All Rights Reserved.

This series is called Vanishing Points, a collection of images that follows my Unstable Matter theme exploring interrelated mutable forms. The photo was made of the Absolute Towers with my new tilt-shift lens, Canon’s 24mm TS-E, great for keeping perfect focus top to bottom.

 

Approaching winter, Mars

Approaching winter, Mars

“Deep shadows create dramatic contrasts between light and dark in this
high-resolution close-up of the martian surface. Recorded on January
24 by the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the
scene spans about 1.5 kilometers across a sand dune field in a
southern highlands crater. Captured when the Sun was just 5 degrees
above the local horizon, only the dune crests are caught in full
sunlight. With the long, cold winter approaching the red planet’s
southern hemisphere, bright ridges of seasonal frost line the martian
dunes.” – from Astronomy Picture of the Day

Willow with misty lake by Jeanne McRight

Weeping willow with misty lake
©2014 Jeanne McRight. All Rights Reserved.

The silver pink of early morning sunrise through the fog got me up and out. I was still half asleep when I took this photo; the image through the viewfinder was like a waking dream.

Fix Your Profile Picture!

Fix Your Profile Picture!

This makes sense!

“Your profile picture! Remember: this is the answer to the following questions. What’s the first thing a potential employer or client or business colleague notices when they check out your LinkedIn page? Your Facebook page? Your Tweets? The Google results on your name? The Google Images results on your name? If you are a small business owner, what about all of the above on your business’s profile pages.

Your profile picture is about branding you and the business you own. Are you handling it that way?”

– from Fix Your Profile Picture by Rene Oricchio for INC 5000

Business headshot by Jeanne McRight ©2014 Jeanne McRight - Pix-Photography.
Business headshot by Jeanne McRight ©2014 Jeanne McRight – Pix-Photography.

Need a pro headshot? Contact me!

 

 

Martian Chiaroscuro

Image

Image Credit: HiRISEMROLPL (U. Arizona)NASA

My friend Gil sent me this exquisite image from NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day, which includes the following description:

“Deep shadows create dramatic contrasts between light and dark in this high-resolution close-up of the martian surface. Recorded on January 24 by the HiRISE camera onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, the scene spans about 1.5 kilometers across a sand dune field in a southern highlands crater. Captured when the Sun was just 5 degrees above the local horizon, only the dune crests are caught in full sunlight. With the long, cold winter approaching the red planet’s southern hemisphere, bright ridges of seasonal frost line the martian dunes.”

Add the influence of scale to perception of curving organic forms defined by light and shadow.  For comparison, two steps down in scale from my Form:Convolution series: First, Last Judgment fresco detail designed by Georgio Vasari, inside the cupola of Florence Cathedral, Rome. The second image, a withering croton leaf.

Detail, The Last Judgment
Fresco designed by Georgio Vasari. Inside the cupola, Florence Cathedral Rome. Photo Copyright ©2014 Jeanne McRight. All Rights Reserved.
Convolution: Croton Leaf
From Form by Jeanne McRight, Pix-Photography. Copyright©2014 Jeanne McRight. All Rights Reserved.

Find a Way

Find a Way

Sad Joy, for C.K. Williams; from Wonder, Serenity series . Copyright©2014_Jeanne_McRight._All_Rights_Reserved.

A solitary evening walk by the lake in late winter, with mist settling in. Beautiful. Luckily I had my camera…

This is popular on 500px, and prints are available there if you are interested.

“Reality does n…

“Reality does not exist by itself. It’s an intellectual construction; and photography is a tool to negotiate our idea of reality.”
– Joan Fontcuberta

– Catalan photographer/artist/writer/educator Joan Fontcuberta, as recently stated in the film made by the Hasselblad Foundation, which accompanied the announcement that he was the recipient of their 2013 International Award in Photography. 

Capture is only one aspect of how an image is perceived – think of all the other variables. Somehow we are able to “get” the image despite its modification by camera noise, shine on a glossy print, monitor color calibration, viewing context, your own unique eyesight, 256 greys, ad infinitum… 

Fontcuberta’s pithy observation brings into question generally-accepted industry standards of photographic excellence. Is it time for a change? Our expectations are driven by swiftly-changing criteria, culturally based. Photographers’ passionate quest for the newest capture and production technology says something about photographic values as they exist now, very different from the past.

One can’t help but wonder what’s down the road.